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PATIENTS & VISITORS MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS EVENTS & HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUT US
 



Dec 2007

Friday, 28 December 2007 


Bloating, nausea, weakness or could it be symptoms of a heart disease? (News, Shin Min Daily News)


Every year, approximately 3,200 people have died from heart disease; the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Singapore. Many never know they have the disease because they have no apparent signs until after an outbreak. Read more



Tuesday, 25 December 2007 


From 'door to balloon' in just 68 minutes (The Straits Times)


Time is of the essence in treating stroke and heart attacks, which claim more lives in Singapore than any other disease. Judith Tan and Lee Hui Chieh find out what some hospitals have been doing in the race to beat these killers. Read more



Tuesday, 25 December 2007 


Speedy stroke diagnosis boosts recovery rate (The Straits Times)


SIXTY people who would have died or been disabled when they had a stroke were instead able to walk out of hospital on their own because of a programme to speed up the diagnosis and treatment process. Read more



Tuesday, 25 December 2007 


Ensuring speedy follow-up to lab results (The Straits Times)


MR MAWARDI Salleh had not even reached home after his medical appointment last month at the National University Hospital (NUH) when his daughter got an urgent phone call from a nurse there. Read more



Sunday, 23 December 2007 


Is your baby too fat? (The Straits Times)


Heavier does not mean healthier, doctors say. LITTLE Gordon Gooi turned one yesterday and tips the scales at 11kg, making him heavier than most babies his age. He wears clothes meant for two-year-olds and his grandmother cannot take care of him because she cannot even lift him. Read more



Thursday, 20 December 2007 


Three children have died from pneumococcal infections in the last five years (News, Shin Min Daily News)


In Singapore, every 10.9 per 100,000 population for all age groups would be infected by the pneumococcal bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae. Children under the age of five and adults 65 years of age or older face a higher risk. Read more



Monday, 17 December 2007 


Fat kids at higher risk of heart attacks as adults (The Straits Times)


But parents here think chubby is better, and try to feed up skinny kids. Read more



Friday, 07 December 2007 


NUH hot on heart surgery (TODAY)


To cater to the needs of an ageing population in Singapore, the National University Hospital (NUH) is fast developing into a national heart centre. Read more



Thursday, 06 December 2007 


It's all caused by allergy! (LOHAS, zbNOW, Lianhe Zaobao)


Parents should always be alert and keep an eye for signs of allergy in their child. Professor Hugo Van Bever (Head and Senior Consultant with the Division of Paediatric Allergy, Immunology & Rheumatology Services) shares with Zaobao readers the importance of early identification of allergen and common allergens. Read more



Wednesday, 05 December 2007 


Survivor: Staying silent is not an option (The Straits Times)


Corporate high-flier turned children's book author tells Judith Tan how her life turned around when she lost her voice. Read more



Tuesday, 04 December 2007 


Worry-free vacation (TODAY)


Prepare for the unexpected when you take your family on holiday Read more



Monday, 03 December 2007 


4% of school going children have scoliosis (News, Lianhe Wanbao)


It has been estimated that there are approximately 1,000 new local cases of scoliosis per year. Read more



Sunday, 02 December 2007 


Are you suffering from acid reflux heartburn? (Lifestyle Yeah!, Lianhe Wanbao)


One out of every 10 Singaporeans is suffering from Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Learn more from Professor Lawrence Ho, senior consultant with the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at NUH. Read more



Saturday, 01 December 2007 


New hope for relapsed leukaemia patients (Science Snippets, The Straits Times)


LEUKAEMIA, or cancer of the blood, can be beaten the first time around. But patients might not be so lucky the next time. Read more